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Pears redux

Post #1460 • February 24, 2010, 8:13 AM • 24 Comments

New at The Moon Fell On Me: Pears.

Comment

1.

wwc

February 24, 2010, 9:41 AM

Very nice Franklin. I like the subtle Williams reference and the internal rhyme of tumbles/wonder along with the sequence of the pear sort of falling apart is delicious.

The one paneled image makes all the others have a different context - as if that panel is the only "real" one and the other images are in your mind or on paper.

2.

Jack

February 24, 2010, 9:55 AM

It's lovely, Franklin, the coloring especially, along with the sense of watery delicacy.

3.

opie

February 24, 2010, 10:49 AM

The pear WC are exquisite. Great touch & color. Everything just right. These are the best "moon" pix you have done, I think, and the idea is appropriately delicate - as Jack says: "watery delicacy".

What "Williams" reference wwc? William Carlos? I am not familiar with this.

4.

dude

February 24, 2010, 11:31 AM

Ditto on all the praise above.

5.

Chris Rywalt

February 24, 2010, 12:06 PM

William Carlos Williams was a small-town doctor and poet who lived a few towns south of where I live now. In fact I lived in Rutherford, NJ for a few years and my kids were born while we lived there. We still go to see movies and shows at the Williams Center erected in his honor.

His most famous poem is "This is just to say" but "The Red Wheelbarrow" is a close second.

6.

Chris Rywalt

February 24, 2010, 12:08 PM

He was also a sometime painter and connected strongly with the visual arts.

7.

opie

February 24, 2010, 12:49 PM

I know who he was, Chris. I wanted to know what the reference was.

8.

wwc

February 24, 2010, 1:40 PM

This Is Just To Say
by William Carlos Williams

I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold

9.

Chris Rywalt

February 24, 2010, 1:41 PM

When you wrote "I am not familiar with this" it sounded like you didn't know who William Carlos Williams was. Franklin strongly echoes "This Is Just to Say" with this ("I have eaten the pears" is the exact same line in both poems with different fruit).

10.

wwc

February 24, 2010, 1:44 PM

Maybe I'm reading that reference into the work, but I think Williams' poem fits well with Franklin's sensibility. I bet Williams would have liked tea ceremonies.

and Opie, I agree that the way the images are made matches what is being depicted.

11.

Chris Rywalt

February 24, 2010, 1:47 PM

Personally, Franklin, I think with the first panel and last panel here you've outdone that Karatsu plate from yesterday's comments.

12.

opie

February 24, 2010, 5:04 PM

Thanks WWC. Very nice.

13.

Chris Rywalt

February 24, 2010, 6:38 PM

Considering Franklin offers apologies to WCW at the end of his art poem, I'd say that Williams' poem definitely suits Franklin's sensibilities. And that means you're not reading into it, Warren, you're seeing what's there.

14.

1

February 24, 2010, 11:49 PM

yes you have it going on with all things pears. big jump from previous fruits.

15.

wwc

February 25, 2010, 9:38 AM

Ha! Chris, I didn't see that WCW at the end. Seriously, I got it from the first line so good job Franklin.

16.

Chris Rywalt

February 25, 2010, 10:19 AM

I got it from the first line too. I was happy to see Franklin's nod at the end, though.

17.

krs

February 26, 2010, 12:28 AM

I have stolen
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
there was someone
who needed them more...

Krs
www.globalocalism.com

18.

David

February 28, 2010, 9:27 AM

This discussion sounds interesting. I'd like to be there as someone who makes furniture out of intense personal necessity (it must be that, since I rarely sell the stuff.)Unfortunately I have commitments then, but I'm going to monitor the follow up on Facebook.


"What's missing is art that seems made by one person out of intense personal necessity often by hand." Roberta Smith, Post Minimal to the Max, NYTimes 2/14/10.

There's a discussion planned to follow up on this:

Date:
Saturday, March 6, 2010
Time:
5:00pm - 7:00pm
Location:
Dylan Hotel, 52 East 41St Street between Park and Madison Avenues

Camilla Fallon -(moderator) painter, writer
Jill Conner- writer
John Haber- writer, haberarts.com
Lisa Beck- artist, writer
Peter Reginato- artist, Art Students League
Dennis Kardon- painter, writer, teacher SVA

I have a link to the full description on my Facebook page.

19.

Chris Rywalt

February 28, 2010, 12:51 PM

I'm on Peter Reginato's mailing list for some reason. I always mean to get out one of his shows but somehow never do.

20.

Krs

February 28, 2010, 8:50 PM

"What's missing is art that seems made by one person out of intense personal necessity often by hand." Roberta Smith, Post Minimal to the Max, NYTimes 2/14/10.

I can not make it to the discussion as I am in Tokyo but I will add my comment from here.

"If I do not make anything my mind will most likely implode and I will have no way of communicating anymore"

How is that for personal necessity?
Krs
www.globalocalism.com

21.

Chris Rywalt

March 1, 2010, 3:17 PM

I'm mulling a post refuting the worth of "intense personal necessity".

22.

John

March 1, 2010, 4:10 PM

You should have an easy time of it, Chris. A lot of bad art is done out of "intense personal necessity", more of it than good art, I suspect.

23.

Chris Rywalt

March 1, 2010, 5:47 PM

I think part of my thesis is that "intense personal necessity" is irrelevant, actually.

24.

Jack

March 1, 2010, 9:24 PM

Chris, pretty much everything is irrelevant, except how good the art in question is.

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