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Post #601 • August 12, 2005, 6:55 AM • 42 Comments

Today's my birthday. I'm soft-pedaling the birthday deal this year, as well as the whole event, but I'll mention it once - buy me something off my Amazon wish list (UPDATE: link fixed) and your thank-you note will come with a work of art by yours truly. (Four-week delivery guaranteed!)

After repeated pesterings, Kathleen finally launched her blog, The Next Few Hours.

This Saturday is Blowhard, a fundraiser to get air-conditioning into the hadean cavern that Dorsch Gallery becomes during the summer months, namely, March through October. I'll be performing t'ai chi fan form; other, more entertaining acts will also do their thing.

Comment

1.

Jack

August 12, 2005, 10:37 AM

Nice abstract show yesterday at Miami International University of Art and Design on Biscayne Blvd. (John Germain, Kathleen Staples and Daniel Weihnacht). Some of the pieces could have been better lit, and the layout of the space is somewhat wayward, but it was worth the trip. All of the work was interesting, but I was especially taken with the large pieces by Staples, clearly influenced by Olitski but with a generally softer, more sinuous and understated character, though hardly timid--sort of like less bravura and gentler flow. I hope Franklin can post some pics.

2.

Hans

August 12, 2005, 11:15 AM

Dear Franklin, this is the greatest day to have birthday. I wish you to reach the 100 and then starting with the second half. Your Website is a big inspiration for me, the topics, the ideas, the discussions. I wish you freedom, health, love, energy, courage, ideas, cool things to happen, new experiences, interesting art.
With my best regards to you and your closest family and friends. Hans

3.

George

August 12, 2005, 11:23 AM

Hans, that was a very nice comment, hats off to you.

and Franklin, I want to join in wishing you a happy birthday and many thanks for the hard work you put inkeeping up this sikte.

4.

oldpro

August 12, 2005, 11:43 AM

Yes, Happy Brithday, somewhat belated but not at all reluctant.

5.

Kerry

August 12, 2005, 12:00 PM

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FRANKLIN !

6.

Germain

August 12, 2005, 12:16 PM

Franklin--
The very best to you today and every day and thanks for a great site!

7.

pirula

August 12, 2005, 12:22 PM

Hey Franklin, Happy Birthday, hope you have a good one. "Friends" on your wish list? And I thought I knew you.

8.

Jack

August 12, 2005, 12:44 PM

Franklin, your wish list refuses to load at this PC, but happy birthday anyway.

9.

Franklin

August 12, 2005, 1:58 PM

'Friends' on my wish list?! What the...

Okay, the link seems to go wherever your wish list is, which isn't the right idea exactly. (I took it down.) If you feel so inclined, go to Amazon, search for my name under Wish Lists, and you should find me easily enough. Somebody else may be able to get a vaild link for me...

Thanks to all for the kind words and wishes.

10.

Franklin

August 12, 2005, 2:11 PM

I logged out of Amazon and went back to my wish list via this address. Does it work?

11.

oldpro

August 12, 2005, 2:24 PM

That makes a lot more sense. I was about to write and say I sure am glad that this blog is not about pop culture, because you could chase me with the stuff on that other wish list.

It was not my wish list either, for sure. I guess if someone else got the same thing it was just a generic list of stuff they want to sell.

12.

jake

August 12, 2005, 2:31 PM

happy birthday.

13.

Franklin

August 12, 2005, 2:34 PM

Great, that link was up for seven hours. Now I'm going to be getting a Friends DVD from somebody. Well, Amazon has a pretty good returns policy. I'll update the link above.

14.

Hans

August 12, 2005, 2:35 PM

Franklin,

wishlist works now. I send you another item. But where to ship ? Reply to my E-mail-Adress. Hans

15.

Franklin

August 12, 2005, 2:38 PM

Hans, I think if you add it to your cart it ships to me automatically. If there's any trouble let me know.

16.

Hans

August 12, 2005, 2:45 PM

Franklin, I tried this, but it shows me only my own shipping adresses, and anyway I wanted to send you another book, not from your wishlist. Because on your birthday you should get a real (unexpected) present, although its only a simple book.

17.

James W. Bailey

August 12, 2005, 2:59 PM

"Class is a legal fiction," says Marx; however, according to Prinn, it is not so much class that is a legal fiction, but rather the economy, and some would say the rubicon, of class. Lyotard promotes the use of neotextual feminism to challenge outdated perceptions of sexual identity. However, the subject is contextualised into a cultural theory that includes sexuality as a whole.

Lacan uses the term 'preconstructive deconstructivist theory' to denote a self-supporting paradox. But Bataille suggests the use of the predeconstructivist paradigm of narrative to read and modify class.

Sontag uses the term 'neotextual feminism' to denote the bridge between reality and society. Thus, the main theme of the works of Gaiman is not desublimation per se, but postdesublimation. If Batailleist `powerful communication' holds, we have to choose between preconstructive deconstructivist theory and the semiotic paradigm of consensus. However, Debord uses the term 'neotextual feminism' to denote a mythopoetical reality.

Dahmus implies that we have to choose between preconstructive deconstructivist theory and preconceptualist narrative. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a neotextual feminism that includes truth as a paradox.

Sontag promotes the use of the capitalist paradigm of context to deconstruct sexism. Therefore, the premise of neotextual feminism suggests that expression must come from the masses.

"James, chil!"

"What?"

"It's Franklin's birthday!"

"Oh...Happy birthday Franklin!"

James W. Bailey

18.

jake

August 12, 2005, 3:01 PM

well, cant get you one of those books as a present

but can get you a lead to an artist i really like, think is amazing, and incredibly prolific.

His name is Georges Rousse and is properly a photographer by in the sense of the resultant object, but his process is much more of installationthat is best appreciated through a specific point of view or a camera.

Anyways, if you knew him, whadya think?
and if you didn't, ditto?

19.

Franklin

August 12, 2005, 3:55 PM

James, that was great - I postdesublimated green tea all over my copy of Ecrits.

20.

oldpro

August 12, 2005, 4:36 PM

Yeah, James, excellent. I downloaded it for my writing class.

21.

catfish

August 12, 2005, 4:41 PM

Franklin and James, If you liked the last one you'll love this, complete with footnotes (get all you want at elsewhere.org):

===================

"Sexual identity is intrinsically meaningless," says Lyotard; however, according to Hamburger[1] , it is not so much sexual identity that is intrinsically meaningless, but rather the stasis, and some would say the meaninglessness, of sexual identity. The subject is contextualised into a postdialectic cultural theory that includes culture as a reality. In a sense, an abundance of dematerialisms concerning submodern theory may be found.

If postdialectic cultural theory holds, we have to choose between modernism and cultural Marxism. However, a number of discourses concerning not deappropriation, but postdeappropriation exist.

The premise of neoconceptual theory suggests that the law is part of the genre of art. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a postdialectic cultural theory that includes consciousness as a whole. Many situationisms concerning modernism may be revealed. But Debord uses the term 'postdialectic cultural theory' to denote the fatal flaw, and subsequent paradigm, of capitalist sexuality.

2. Modernism and subdialectic libertarianism
If one examines subdialectic libertarianism, one is faced with a choice: either accept modernism or conclude that the significance of the artist is significant form. Baudrillard suggests the use of postdialectic cultural theory to challenge the status quo. In a sense, the main theme of Finnis's[2] analysis of modernism is the bridge between sexual identity and society.

Lacan's essay on subdialectic libertarianism implies that context comes from the masses, given that language is interchangeable with culture. It could be said that the primary theme of the works of Stone is a cultural totality.

Several theories concerning the role of the reader as participant exist. In a sense, the subject is contextualised into a postdialectic cultural theory that includes truth as a reality.

3. Stone and the neosemanticist paradigm of narrative
The characteristic theme of Dahmus's[3] critique of postdialectic cultural theory is not discourse, as modernism suggests, but subdiscourse. Marx promotes the use of subdialectic libertarianism to read narrativity. However, in Platoon, Stone deconstructs modernism; in JFK, however, he denies postdialectic cultural theory.

"Society is fundamentally elitist," says Lacan; however, according to Tilton[4] , it is not so much society that is fundamentally elitist, but rather the failure of society. Derrida uses the term 'the neodialectic paradigm of context' to denote a mythopoetical totality. In a sense, de Selby[5] holds that we have to choose between postdialectic cultural theory and Baudrillardist hyperreality.

"Sexual identity is part of the rubicon of language," says Bataille. Sontag suggests the use of subdialectic libertarianism to attack capitalism. Therefore, the example of modernism prevalent in Gibson's Count Zero emerges again in Mona Lisa Overdrive.

The main theme of the works of Gibson is not, in fact, situationism, but postsituationism. Thus, the premise of postdialectic cultural theory suggests that the task of the observer is deconstruction.

If the cultural paradigm of discourse holds, we have to choose between postdialectic cultural theory and Lacanist obscurity. Therefore, an abundance of dematerialisms concerning subdialectic libertarianism may be found. The primary theme of Wilson's[6] essay on modernism is a self-justifying whole. It could be said that Marx uses the term 'subdialectic libertarianism' to denote not situationism, as Foucault would have it, but subsituationism.

Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to deconstruct and analyse culture. But Finnis[7] states that we have to choose between subdialectic libertarianism and Marxist capitalism.

The subject is interpolated into a postdialectic cultural theory that includes sexuality as a totality. In a sense, the main theme of the works of Spelling is the role of the poet as observer.

4. Modernism and the dialectic paradigm of reality
In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. Derrida uses the term 'postdialectic cultural theory' to denote not discourse, but subdiscourse. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a postconceptual construction that includes reality as a reality.

"Class is used in the service of class divisions," says Bataille; however, according to Hanfkopf[8] , it is not so much class that is used in the service of class divisions, but rather the fatal flaw, and eventually the economy, of class. Debord uses the term 'the dialectic paradigm of reality' to denote the genre of submodern sexuality. However, the subject is interpolated into a textual discourse that includes narrativity as a totality.

Lyotard uses the term 'the dialectic paradigm of reality' to denote a mythopoetical paradox. Therefore, many theories concerning the difference between class and society exist.

Neodeconstructivist feminism holds that discourse is created by the collective unconscious. In a sense, Marx uses the term 'postdialectic cultural theory' to denote the role of the participant as poet. If textual subsemioticist theory holds, we have to choose between postdialectic cultural theory and Lyotardist narrative. Thus, the characteristic theme of Hubbard's[9] analysis of textual dematerialism is the collapse, and subsequent defining characteristic, of preconstructive class.

Foucault suggests the use of modernism to attack the status quo. It could be said that the main theme of the works of Smith is not discourse per se, but subdiscourse.

5. Smith and the dialectic paradigm of reality
The primary theme of Humphrey's[10] essay on postdialectic cultural theory is the bridge between sexual identity and consciousness. A number of situationisms concerning the dialectic paradigm of reality may be revealed. Therefore, in Mallrats, Smith deconstructs postdialectic cultural theory; in Dogma he affirms the dialectic paradigm of reality.

If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either reject postdialectic cultural theory or conclude that art is capable of significance. Sartre uses the term 'the dialectic paradigm of reality' to denote not, in fact, narrative, but prenarrative. But Brophy[11] suggests that we have to choose between postdialectic cultural theory and Foucaultist power relations.

The characteristic theme of the works of Smith is a capitalist whole. The main theme of la Tournier's[12] model of the dialectic paradigm of reality is not appropriation as such, but postappropriation. It could be said that the masculine/feminine distinction intrinsic to Gaiman's Stardust is also evident in The Books of Magic, although in a more mythopoetical sense.

If modernism holds, we have to choose between subtextual desituationism and the dialectic paradigm of context. However, any number of constructions concerning the role of the observer as writer exist.

Derrida's critique of postdialectic cultural theory holds that consensus is a product of the masses, but only if the dialectic paradigm of reality is valid; otherwise, Sontag's model of predeconstructive dialectic theory is one of "neostructural socialism", and hence intrinsically impossible. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a postdialectic cultural theory that includes consciousness as a totality. In Death: The Time of Your Life, Gaiman reiterates the dialectic paradigm of reality; in Black Orchid, however, he denies semanticist precultural theory. In a sense, a number of narratives concerning modernism may be discovered.

The characteristic theme of the works of Gaiman is a self-referential whole. But Humphrey[13] implies that the works of Gaiman are postmodern.

The main theme of la Fournier's[14] model of the dialectic paradigm of reality is the difference between class and society. Therefore, in Stardust, Gaiman affirms postdialectic cultural theory; in Death: The Time of Your Life he reiterates postmodernist libertarianism.

1. Hamburger, D. (1973) Narratives of Fatal flaw: Modernism in the works of Glass. Harvard University Press
2. Finnis, I. M. ed. (1986) Modernism in the works of Stone. And/Or Press

3. Dahmus, C. F. E. (1978) The Expression of Meaninglessness: Modernism and postdialectic cultural theory. Oxford University Press

4. Tilton, V. H. ed. (1982) Modernism in the works of Gibson. Panic Button Books

5. de Selby, Q. (1970) Realities of Paradigm: Modernism in the works of Rushdie. And/Or Press

6. Wilson, U. P. E. ed. (1989) Postdialectic cultural theory and modernism. Schlangekraft

7. Finnis, Q. C. (1992) Neocapitalist Dematerialisms: Postdialectic cultural theory in the works of Spelling. And/Or Press

8. Hanfkopf, Y. ed. (1985) Modernism, structuralist Marxism and nationalism. Harvard University Press

9. Hubbard, U. E. (1970) The Forgotten Sky: Postdialectic cultural theory in the works of Smith. Cambridge University Press

10. Humphrey, T. L. J. ed. (1996) Nationalism, structuralist deconstruction and modernism. And/Or Press

11. Brophy, G. J. (1973) Consensuses of Paradigm: Modernism and postdialectic cultural theory. Oxford University Press

12. la Tournier, B. H. Z. ed. (1995) Postdialectic cultural theory in the works of Gaiman. Loompanics

13. Humphrey, D. (1972) Textual Discourses: Postdialectic cultural theory and modernism. O'Reilly & Associates

14. la Fournier, I. G. ed. (1998) Neomaterialist cultural theory, modernism and nationalism. And/Or Press

22.

oldpro

August 12, 2005, 5:20 PM

I had a girlfriend once who insisted that everything that happens on your birthday is a precursor of the year ahead.

So Franklin will get dumb presents from the wrong list and be plagued with pomo for the next 12 months, poor guy.

23.

Hans

August 12, 2005, 5:20 PM

Better then to make art, ...everybody can look at it, without all those random definitions, wich nobody can prove. But art proves by itselfs and doesnt need some stupid curators. Did Cezanne or Pissaro needed those curators and their clumsy advices ? No. Did anything change since that ? No.

24.

Elizabeth

August 12, 2005, 5:58 PM

Dear Franklin, fellow Leo, I wish you many many years of love, joy , adventure and excitement in your life....somehow I have a feeling thats what you'll have. Happy Birthday Franklin.
OP; please dont say that please...thats scarey!!

25.

oldpro

August 12, 2005, 6:57 PM

Oh, I think maybe it might not happen that way, Elizabeth. Don't worry. With Leos it is always onwards and upwards.

26.

ahab

August 12, 2005, 8:40 PM

Yeah, Franklin, the Pixies. The painting books and zen books didn't surprise me.

You, me, and Frank Black for that coffee one day, too bad I hardly live any closer to Montreal than Miami. I couldn't see the Pixies here in town when they came through on their recent reunion tour. I was sad.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Einspruch, sir.

27.

James W. Bailey

August 12, 2005, 9:03 PM

From the first Postmodernist, St. Paul de Man:

14: For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin.
15: For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
16: If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good.
17: Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
18: For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.
19: For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
20: Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
21: I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.
22: For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
23: But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24: O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

"James, James!"

"Geez, what now!"

"You're quoting from the St. Paul...of the Book of Romans. You've already told Franklin happy birthday. It's after 6:00pm in DC and it's time to go to bed."

"Oh, sorry...so that's from the St. Paul, the real St. Paul. Man, that dude sounds like a real postmodernist to me!"

28.

Hans

August 13, 2005, 5:30 AM

Wow. You like the Pixies too ?

Since that, Music didnt interest me anymore very much. Some 15 years later again, with EMINEM.

;-)

29.

Cat

August 13, 2005, 5:57 AM

" In spirit, the Arts are Gods. They heal, revolutionize, fulfil, perfect."
- Native American Author Unknown

All Blessings & Big light on your birthday and always.

30.

jordan

August 13, 2005, 6:32 AM

happy b- day man - you will get 15 grand in dec. as a gift from all of the bloggers.

31.

jordan

August 13, 2005, 7:02 AM

- and another thing, my sun sign is in the house of leo yet it is related to air-head-ism. ego meets aloofness...

32.

jordan

August 13, 2005, 7:25 AM

Huh, Beauty and Sublime; Jack, there is a great text called 'Art History and the Rise of Western Modernism by David Summers that you should read. It's heavy but great if you've got the time.
I'd love to talk to you about beauty...

33.

jordan

August 13, 2005, 7:35 AM

I'm missing a (' ) and I intended to write 'with' instead of t'o' for Jack, (whom I respect greatly).

34.

craigfrancis

August 13, 2005, 4:13 PM

happy birthday dude.

35.

mek

August 14, 2005, 10:45 AM

franklin, Namaste. peace to you in celebration of your birth

36.

alesh

August 14, 2005, 3:41 PM

While working on this, i tried to find a reference somewhere to the arts writers panel at the Dorsch back in 2003, of which there appears to be none, in part, i think, because it was during the lull between the sunburn and artblog.net.

Research did, however, turn up the fact that the sunburn is alive and well. while linking to www.thesunburn.com directly redirects to go see art, it is possible to deeplink by googling around the site, which produced this and this. Also, no panel report, though.


Nevermind, i found it. How silly of me to suppose there might have been a lull. For the sake of posterity and presentity, here is a link to the Sunburn articles, some of which deserve to be read.

37.

oldpro

August 14, 2005, 5:43 PM

I think the Leo has become significantly more imperious since writing what you link to, Alesh, and to good effect, in my opinion.

38.

ahab

August 14, 2005, 6:19 PM

I'm not going to read all of the sunburn articles in the hope of finding a good one, but should someone come across one worth digging into, would that person let me know which it is?

39.

Franklin

August 14, 2005, 8:24 PM

This one's not bad. There are a few more articles on a different page somewhere. The Sunburn is a mess but straightening it out is not a high priority.

40.

ahab

August 14, 2005, 9:25 PM

Oh, I see. I didn't immediately get that it was another one of your writing projects. Thanks for the link.

41.

alesh

August 15, 2005, 9:26 AM

"Significantly more imperious" is an excellent way to put it. I like the old stuff, too, though, and it's a trip back in time. Also, I like the sunburn for the name and searing design.

42.

George

August 15, 2005, 9:44 AM

A link from this mornings reading. Toulouse-Lautrec - L'oeuvre lithographique complete, large scans (1000 px) of 370 of his lithographs.

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