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Post #326 • July 20, 2004, 7:25 AM • 11 Comments

S.A. on the Yellow Chairs, oil on panel, 24 x 32 inches. I've been in a Balthusian mood lately.

Comment

1.

Ware

July 20, 2004, 3:14 PM

That looks like a beauty to me. The painting and the girl!

2.

oldpro

July 20, 2004, 6:20 PM

The nice thing about this picture is the odd, sweet richness of the color and surface. That quality is almost completely absent from your more painterly pictures (not that it is necessary, of course). Got any more? Still life would be interesting treated this way also.

3.

shaolin soccer mom

July 20, 2004, 7:02 PM

Nice to see a real painting out of you for a change.

Felicitation!

4.

Momoko

July 20, 2004, 10:27 PM

It is interesting in that the body is forming two "Z" shapes (arms for one, and the body itself for another). There might be more Z's in the picture.

I have been sticking my nosey nose into art industry in Miami area for three weeks or so. This is a report of my investigation.

5.

catfish

July 20, 2004, 11:56 PM

Momoko: The use of a pseudonym is very common on blogs. Thus, I think you overrate its specific importance to artblog in your "nosey nose" investigation. I don't understand why you say "only those who have nothing to do with art can freely talk with the identity disclosed". I have posted things on this blog with my "real name" and so have many others.

You seem to set up a contrast between the politics of art and the skills of art. Truth is, neither politics nor skill are essential to art, though both aspects seem to hang around art, just like ants hang around a picnic.

I certainly agree Miami is not Paris or Tokyo.

6.

Jack

July 21, 2004, 12:33 AM

Actually, Franklin, this picture reminds me more of Paula Rego than Balthus, for what that may be worth (if anything).

7.

oldpro

July 21, 2004, 12:36 AM

Momoko:
There is a phrase in fairly common use - "catching some Zs" - which means taking a nap.

I go along pretty much with your 5 precepts, but I agree with catfish on the freedom/anonymity question. To me, anonymity in a blog is not for protection - I have absolutely nothing to lose here no matter what I say - but a luxury. Anonymity allows me to be only a voice, completely detached from any considerations anyone may have of me as a person. I can be a bum or a genius, a famous artist or critic or someone from out of the blue with no art background at all. As catfish put it a while ago, it defeats "credentialism" and creates a completely level playing field. And if, for some, it is protection so thay can speak out without fear, all the better.

8.

oldpro

July 21, 2004, 12:48 AM

Jack, More like Rego than Balthus, but all three share that inert, dead pan style of posing. Rego also uses a lot more direct light source and shading, which Franklin could maybe use more of also.

9.

Momoko

July 21, 2004, 1:30 AM

Responding to catfish: I have seen an artist from Soviet Union with high achievements giving up on art just because he didn't know the right people here in Miami. All the works were sitting in his closets not even being seen by anyone. He was totally broke, struggling just to pay for his living expenses if he could pay them on time. He could not go on as an artist because he refused to play politics. I think he knew art, but he didn't know the game artists play here. I believe someone with the same skill or even less can be more successful than him in terms of getting noticed by art dealers and such. Just like everything else in life, it is a matter of who you know. And it is called politics.

politics - noun: social relations involving authority or power

10.

catfish

July 21, 2004, 7:33 AM

Many of the artists I respect have their works stored in closets where no one looks at them.

11.

oldpro

July 21, 2004, 2:27 PM

That's right, Momoko. An artist is someone who wants to make art. The kind of artist catfish refers to gives up on the market, not on his art.

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